Les champs de roses

Living out loud. Feminism, travel, things I believe in.

missdunlop:

walkthepathbyday:

"There are three things you must ask yourself before you say anything…"

Nobody follows this rule.

This is going on my classroom wall, so that I can point at when I have students begging to interrupt me during teaching time….

(Source: belonely, via girlwithalessonplan)

Websites for when you want to:

nightvaliants:

(Source: draeneii, via the-love-you-breathe)

theblueboxonbakerstreet:

the-fandoms-are-cool:

jellobatch:

psicologicamenteblog:

Source: An inside look at ADHD.

Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

Me 100% of the time. Luckily Ito help for my ADD when I was a child

fun facts!

  • ADD and ADHD are the same disorder, Attention Deficit Disorder was officially renamed Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in 1994. Many people use ADD to refer to Type One presented here, and ADHD to refer to Type Two, but they are the same core disorder.
  • In many cases where ADHD carries into adulthood, it’s a genetic issue [My grandfather, mother, siblings, and I have all been diagnosed with ADHD], though this does not always occur.

hello yes this is me

more fun facts!

  • there are a lot of talks about how ADHD is overdiagnosed, and that may be true for boys, but for girls ADHD is severely underdiagnosed.
  • older studies mostly looked at hyperactive boys and that’s the perception we have of ADHD. because of this many girls will go undiagnosed until adulthood.
  • most girls/women who have ADHD are inattentive type. they tend to be introverted, disorganized and daydreamers. 
  • girls will internalize these as personal failings and teenage girls have a much higher rate of suicide and self harm because of it
  • ADHD is often comorbid with anxiety and depression, both of which are caused by the failings from having ADHD
  • depression can present itself differently in people with ADHD. it’s more of a discouragement from constantly failing, but it can be just as debilitating.
  • read this article from the atlantic: It’s Different for Girls with ADHD

themoreyouknow.jpg

(via gtfothinspo)

recoveryisbeautiful:

I actually forgot this was on Something-Fishy but here are some photos of my coping bank. I used bright colored sheets of paper folded in half and filled an old aromatherapy stress relief body scrub jar (it still has the scent… BONUS). I put the text from Something-Fishy to make it easier since I’m not great at explaining things… they also give you some examples of things you can put in your coping bank but in the end it’s really up to you… put in anything that helps!! And have fun!!

Text from Something-Fishy

Coping Bank is the same — we take what we learn about coping alternatives and put them away, in the backs of our minds, for when we needs them. But during recovery that can be difficult, and during times of crisis it’s often hard to think of what we should do.

Make your own Coping Bank and you can go and make a withdrawal when you are feeling stressed, overwhelmed, confused (etc.) and in need of healthy ways to handle it.

How to do it:

1. Use a shoebox, an old piggy bank, a tupperware container, a juice bottle — it should be something you can cut a slit in to make your deposits, but that is easily opened so you can make withdrawals when you have to.

Decorate the item you chose with magic markers, crayons, paper, buttons, ribbon, photos of loved-ones, affirmations, fabric, cartoon characters, anything you like!

Cut a small slit somewhere in the top or side of your item — this is where you will make deposits.

Write a whole bunch of healthy coping alternatives on small sheets of colored paper (like construction paper, stationary, old greeting cards, index cards). Here are some examples…

  • Write in your Journal
  • Listen to your favorite music
  • Write at least 5 affirmations
  • Color in a coloring book
  • Play your favorite instrument
  • Tell one person how you feel
  • Pop or stomp on bubble-wrap
  • Have a water balloon fight
  • Paint a picture
  • Take a long hot bath
  • Go berry picking
  • Take a long drive
  • Take a leisurely walk
  • Rent your favorite movie
  • Take a trip to the toy store
  • Fingerpaint, Doodle
  • Build with blocks. Build a tower and knock it down
  • Build with Legos
  • Spend time with your pet
  • more ways to cope…
  • Come up with your own too!

Take all these little sheets of paper and deposit them into your bank. You can always add more as time goes on, you can make deposits whenever the mood strikes you! You should initially try to get at least ten to fifteen ideas in your bank.

Place you Coping Bank on your dresser, next to your bed, in your china cabinet — someplace easily accessible and where you’ll know where it is.

Make a mental commitment to yourself to go to your Coping Bank when you need to!

Next time you are feeling sad, angry, overwhelmed, confused, or stressed-out, and need to find healthy ways to cope, go to your Coping Bank and make a withdrawal. Pull out one of those sheets of paper and do what it says! (remember to put it back in your bank after you’ve read it, so it’s there for the future).

Remind yourself… “I am taking care of ME!”

(via gtfothinspo)

Stand naked in front of a mirror for a long time, under unflattering light if possible. Trace the rises and falls of the little ripples on your skin — the scars, the dimples, the cellulite — and think about how much you try to hide these things in your day-to-day. Wonder why you hate them so much, and if this hate stems from somewhere within yourself, or as a result of being told all your life that it’s wrong to have physical flaws. Wonder what you would think of your body if you never looked at a magazine, if you never thought about celebrities and models, if you never had to wonder where someone would rate you on a scale of 10. Look at yourself until the initial recoil softens, and you can consider your features in a more forgiving frame of mind.

Listen to the music which makes you want to both sob and dance with uninhibited joy, and allow yourself to repeat any song you want as many times as your heart desires. Think of the person you are when you have your favorite song in your headphones and are walking down a street you feel you own completely, swaying your hips and smiling for no good reason — remember how many things you love about yourself during those moments, how much you are willing to forgive in yourself, how confident you are for no good reason. Try to think of confidence as a gift you give yourself when you need it, instead of something you have to siphon from every unreliable source in your life. Dance because the music makes you remember how much you love yourself, not because it allows you to forget the fact that you don’t.

Write a list of all the things you like about yourself, even if you think it’s a self-indulgent and narcissistic activity. Start as early as you like in your life — put down that time you won a trophy playing little league soccer when you were eight and then got an extra-large shake at the DQ on the way home, and don’t feel silly for remembering it. Try to understand how many sources in your life happiness can come from, how many things you could be proud of if you chose to. Ask yourself why you so tightly limit the things you take pride in, why you set your own hurdles for happiness and fulfillment so much higher than you do with anyone else in your life. Let your list go on for pages and pages if you want it to.

Touch and care for yourself with the attention and the patience that you would someone you loved more than life itself. Rub lotion in small circles on your elbows and hands when it is cold and your skin is dry and cracked. Make soup for yourself when your nose is running and curl up, with your favorite movie, in a pile of expertly-stacked pillows. Light a few candles and let their glow flicker against your body. Admire how gentle they are, how delicately their warmth touches you — wonder why you don’t let yourself do the same. Soak your feet in warm water at the end of a long day, until they have forgiven you for walking on them for so long without so much as a “thank you.” Listen to your body when it aches to be touched, and don’t be afraid to give it every orgasm that you may have been too ashamed to ask for in someone else’s bed.

Be patient with yourself, and don’t worry if a switch doesn’t flip in you which abruptly takes you from “crippling self-doubt” to “uncompromising self-love.” Allow yourself all the trepidation and clumsy, uneven infatuation that you would with a promising stranger. Try only to be kinder, to be softer, and to remember all of the things within you which are worth loving. Listen to the voice in the back of your head which tells you, as much out of sadness as anger, “You are ugly. You are stupid. You are boring.” Give it the fleeting moment of attention it so craves, and then remind it, “Even if that were true, I’d still be worth loving.”